Revitalizing a crucial ceremony was just the beginning

Yumari is a vital ceremony for the Raramuri community of Mogotavo. It is a prayer for rain, health, and maintaining the union between humans, Nature and Onoruame, the Great Grandfather God. Yet, there was only one man left that could sing its song.

Raramuri shaman and artist Makawi set on a mission to revitalize the Yumari ceremony. The project evolved and expanded. It has sparked a cultural awakening that strengthened their communities in the face of immense challenges. Learn more here.

Support Sacred Ceremonies

Ritual and Ceremony

Supporting the continuance of Ancestral Traditions

Ritual and Ceremony

Supporting the continuance of Ancestral Traditions

Revitalizing a crucial ceremony was just the beginning

Yumari is a vital ceremony for the Raramuri community of Mogotavo. It is a prayer for rain, health, and maintaining the union between humans, Nature and Onoruame, the Great Grandfather God. Yet, there was only one man left that could sing its song.

Raramuri shaman and artist Makawi set on a mission to revitalize the Yumari ceremony. The project evolved and expanded. It has sparked a cultural awakening that strengthened their communities in the face of immense challenges. Learn more here.

Support Sacred Ceremonies

Ceremony and ritual reconnect us to the sacred, to our ancestors, and to our place within the web of life. We support Indigenous Peoples’ rituals and ceremonies around the world, strengthening the fabric of connection between humans and the sacred

Articles

Busuréliame:  Awakening the Conscience in the Sierra Tarahumara

The Yumari Project, which is coordinated by Tarahumara shaman and artist, Makawi, has evolved into a more comprehensive program for cultural awakening in the community of Mogotavo. The Tarahumara word for cultural education is busuréliame, which signifies to awake the conscience of the pueblo to universal knowledge.

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Wanbdi Wakita, the calling of a Holy Man

Wanbdi Wakita, whose name translates into English as Looking Eagle, was born at home with the help of a midwife on a breezy day in October in the community of Sioux Valley Dakota Nation. It was 1940. Overseas the world was at war, but a different kind of struggle was taking place at home.

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Words from the Mamos. Insights from the Black Line Journey 2015

The Indigenous peoples of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Martha in Colombia have a mission of utmost importance: to bring healing and balance to the earth for the benefit of all of humanity through their spiritual work of offerings and ceremony. They consider their land to be the heart of the world, contained by an invisible “Black Line.”

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Maasai youth go on a life changing journey back to tradition

The Maasai youth, whose people reside and travel along the border between Kenya and Tanzania, sit in the crosshairs of modernization. Like many indigenous youth they face immense pressure by outside forces attempting to instill in them that their ways are backwards, irrelevant and something for which they should be ashamed.

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Reclaiming the Sacredness of Water

“I come from a long line of teachers of rivers, who did not live in big cities and traffic,” shared Chief Caleen Sisk, spiritual and tribal leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe at Resilience of Sacred Places: Defining Security, dialogues hosted by the Sacred Land Film Project and the David Brower Center in July 2015. These dialogues shared the vision and perspectives of Native American women, defenders of sacred sites and indigenous cultures, on “homelands” and “security.”

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