Kusi Kawsay

Lucía is a wise, glowing woman from the Amaru community in the Peruvian highlands. She is also the weaving teacher at the Kusi Kawsay School, a place where children strengthen the fabric of their traditions by learning arts that are part of their culture.

She teaches them this sacred art that involves mathematics, deep concentration, creativity and knowledge of the cosmology woven into their patterns. To weave properly, the children must learn concepts like Ayni, the word for reciprocity in the Quechua language. To receive you must give.

Support indigenous led education projects

Education

Supporting the transmission of ancestral wisdom to future generations

Education

Supporting the transmission of ancestral wisdom to future generations

Kusi Kawsay

Lucía is a wise, glowing woman from the Amaru community in the Peruvian highlands. She is also the weaving teacher at the Kusi Kawsay School, a place where children strengthen the fabric of their traditions by learning arts that are part of their culture.

She teaches them this sacred art that involves mathematics, deep concentration, creativity and knowledge of the cosmology woven into their patterns. To weave properly, the children must learn concepts like Ayni, the word for reciprocity in the Quechua language. To receive you must give.

Support indigenous led education projects

There is no time to lose. In this age of cultural erosion, we need to respond quickly to maintain the transmission of knowledge to the next generation. We support schools that teach and inspire children to sing their songs, follow their ceremonial cycles and learn traditional healing.

Weaving Wisdom

We invite you to experience the wisdom of the weaving in this video of Lucia’s weaving class at the Kusi Kawsay school. Through the movements of the fibers and the loom, she teaches the children how to shift and move in a balanced and harmonious relationship with each other and with Mother Earth.

Articles

A day at Nii Juinti

A good part of the grant received from Sacred Fire Foundation allowed the Nii Juinti school to buy all the necessary instruments and pay the workforce for cleaning, preparing and planting a wide variety of medicine plants typically utilized in the Shipibo culture by shamans.

read more

Grants

Pin It on Pinterest