Sharing wisdom to protect sacred land

An Indigenous delegation facilitated by Movement Rights visited Aotearoa (New Zealand) to learn more about the revolutionary way the Maori peoples have obtained protection for their lands.  The Te Urewera National Park and the Whanganui River were granted legal personhood based on the recognition of the Maori cosmology that considers them ancestral beings with their own integrity. Learn more here.

Support the sacred wisdom at the core of the movement to protect our earth

Earth Stewardship

Supporting sacred connection to the living natural world

Earth Stewardship

Supporting sacred connection to the living natural world

Sharing wisdom to protect sacred land

An Indigenous delegation facilitated by Movement Rights visited Aotearoa (New Zealand) to learn more about the revolutionary way the Maori peoples have obtained protection for their lands.  The Te Urewera National Park and the Whanganui River were granted legal personhood based on the recognition of the Maori cosmology that considers them ancestral beings with their own integrity. Learn more here.

Support the sacred wisdom at the core of the movement to protect our earth

Traditional Indigenous territories cover up to 24 percent of the world’s land surface and contain 80 percent of the earth’s biodiversity.

Indigenous Peoples’ perspective on life is based on the awareness that all things are interconnected and necessary to each other, and that these relationships are sacred. We recognize that Indigenous Peoples are at the front-line of environmental devastation as their sacred lands become targets for economic gain, and support projects that promote the values of reciprocity and respect that are at the heart of sustainable living.

Articles

Reviving A River, Reviving A Lost Culture

“The elders used to call Myntdu River their mother,” shares H. H. Mohrmen, a Jaintia Unitarian minister and an environmentalist from Meghalaya. Mohrmen is in a jeep with journalists, who are traveling to cover a unique riverine festival that is hosted by elders from communities downstream of Myntdu. The drive on winding roads in the West Jaintia Hills passes by tall areca nut trees wrapped in pepper vines. Below, a rust-hued riverbank glistens in the sun.

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Words from the Mamos. Insights from the Black Line Journey 2015

The Indigenous peoples of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Martha in Colombia have a mission of utmost importance: to bring healing and balance to the earth for the benefit of all of humanity through their spiritual work of offerings and ceremony. They consider their land to be the heart of the world, contained by an invisible “Black Line.”

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Reclaiming the Sacredness of Water

“I come from a long line of teachers of rivers, who did not live in big cities and traffic,” shared Chief Caleen Sisk, spiritual and tribal leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe at Resilience of Sacred Places: Defining Security, dialogues hosted by the Sacred Land Film Project and the David Brower Center in July 2015. These dialogues shared the vision and perspectives of Native American women, defenders of sacred sites and indigenous cultures, on “homelands” and “security.”

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